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embroidery digitizing

Embroidery Digitizing Categories

Cartoons
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I have been using Stitch Graphic Interchange's embroidery digitization services for many years. They always meet my deadlines. The quality of work is outstanding and of course not to forget the price. I highly recommend them to everyone.
Andy Boris
Inline Graphics, Inc.
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In my 19 years in the embroidery industry, I have not found a better digitizing service. Their price is best and quality is top notch. They are great to work with.
Tanya Kim
Stitch Gear Sportswear
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We offer Embroidery Digitizing at $ 1 per 1000 stitches, Vector Conversion at $ 5 per artwork and
Embroidery Designs at $2 per design
 

DIGITIZING GLOSSARY

Appliques


Applique is a way of digitizing, means trimming cut from one piece of fabric and stitched to another to add dimension and texture. If appliqué occupies a significant amount of the design, the stitch count is lower.

ASI


ASI is the shortened form of Advertising Specialty Institute. It has been providing award-winning products and services to the advertising specialty and promotional products industry for over 50 years. ASI publishes print and online business magazines, product catalogs, Web sites and informational directories.

Backing


Woven or non-woven material used underneath the item or fabric being embroidered to provide support and stability for the needle penetration. Best used when hooped with the garment, but also can be placed between the item to be embroidered and the needle plate on flat bed machines.Available in many styles and weights with two basic types (Cutaway and Tearaway).

Bean


A bean stitch is a running stitch that goes from point A to point B and then goes back from point B to point A and then goes forward from point A to point B.

Compensation


Embroidery Digitizing (Punching) technique used to counteract the distortion caused by the interaction of the needle, thread, backing and machine tensions. Also a programmable feature in some software packages.

Copryrighted


If a customer send a picture of artwork or a logo to be digitize, the digitizing company will assume this customer either own the copyright to it or have received written permission from the copyright owner to have it digitized for machine embroidery. If it is a nationally recognized logo, I will probably ask the owner for the written permission. This is to protect the customer from possible copyright infringement.

Digitizing or Punching


Digitizing and Punching are universal terms, the digital means of converting artwork into the vector commands-readable by an embroidery machine's computer-that determine needle penetrations, color changes, stitch characteristics, start and stop points, and so on.

Digitizing Tape


To embroider a shirt or baseball cap, the customer need a digitizing file sometimes referred to a tape. This is because the old embroidery machines used punched paper tapes and a tape reader to operate. With the advancements of new technology and the use of computerized embroidery, 3.5" floppy diskettes are now more common in the industry. An Embroidery Disk and a Digitizing Tape are similar references. A digitizing tape/disk contains all the instructions which tell the embroidery machine what to stitch on the garment.

Embroidery


Decorative stitching on fabric. Generally involves non-lettering designs but can also include lettering and/or monograms. Evidence of embroidery exists during the reign of Egyptian pharaohs, in the writings of Homer and from the Crusaders of the 12th century. Evolved from hand work to manual sewing machines and from hand-looms and schiffli machines with hundreds of needles to high-speed, computerized multihead machines.

Embroidery Digitizing


Embroidery Digitizing or Embroidery Punching is the process of converting artwork into digital data that tells a computerized embroidery machine how to move during the embroidery process.

Embroidery Hoop


A device made from wood, plastic or steel with which fabric is gripped tightly between an inner ring and an outer ring and attached to the machine's pantograph. Machine hoops are designed to push the fabric to the bottom of the inner ring and hold it against the machine bed for embroidering.

Expanded Format


A design program where individual stitches in a design have been specifically digitized for a certain size. Designs punched in this format cannot generally be enlarged or reduced more than 10 to 20 percent without distortion because stitch count remains constant. See "condensed format".

Flat Embroidery


Embroidery that is framed in hoops, usually exclusively on the top of the embroidery machine's hook assembly.

Fill Stitch


A fill stitch is used to cover a large area in a design. Fill stitches can be aligned to create patterns or they can change direction to provide different effects from within the design.

Format


Machine specific readable information.

Finishing


Processes performed after embroidery is complete. Includes trimming loose threads, cutting or tearing away excess backing, removing topping, cleaning any stains, pressing or steaming to remove wrinkles or hoop marks and packaging for sale or shipment.

Geflect


As the same as fill stitch, please see Fill Stitch.

Guide Stitch


Running stitches used to assist in placement of an applique or in the placement of a die for cutting of emblems, also called a cut line.

Hoop Size


Machine embroidery hoops are available in a variety of sizes. They are machine specific and must be designed for the machine you are using. The size of the hoop you use will be determined by the design you are embroidery. The closer the hoop size is to the design, the less likely there will be any movement of the fabric. Movement of the fabric can result in the final stitches being poorly located on the design.

Jump Stitch


Movement of the frame without stitching but with take up lever and hook movement.

Lettering


Embroidery using letters or words, either made completely with stitches, or a combination of cutout applique pieces and stitching.

Lock Stitch


Commonly referred to as a lock-down or tack-down stitch, a lock stitch is formed by three or four consecutive stitches of at least a 10-point movement. It should be used at the end of all columns, fills and at the end of any element in your design where jump stitches will follow, such as color changes or the end of a design. Lock stitches may be stitched in a triangle, star or in a straight line. Lock stitch is also the name of the type of stitch formed by the hook and needle of home sewing machines, as well as computerized embroidery machines.

Machine Language


The codes and formats used by different machine manufacturers within the embroidery industry.

Monogram


Embroidered design composed of one or more letters, usually the initials in a name.

Needle


Small slender sewing instrument with an eye at one end to pass the thread through.

Outline


1. Running, double or bean stitch used to define embroidery details in designs.
2. Digitizing capability to input points to define the perimeter of the embroidered area.

Push and Pull


The terms push and pull are used together so often, it seems at times people believe they happen together. They do sometimes, but in most cases the element and/or the fabric are causing either push or pull, but not both. The exception to this rule tends to be in satin stitch columns, whether in a letter or otherwise. Satin columns can pull in on the ends and out on the sides.

Running Stitch


Running stitches or walk stitches are single line stitches which run one stitch between two needle penetration point. A running stitch goes from point A to point B. They are used for very fine detail and also for underlay.

Satin Stitch


Satin stitches are nothing more than zigzag stitches. A satin stitch can range in thickness from just over 1mm to usually a maximum of 12mm. A satin stitch is normally used for nice detail and for most normal size lettering.

Scanning


Scanners convert designs into a computer format, allowing the digitizer to use even the most primitive of artwork without recreating the design. Many embroidery digitizing systems allow the digitizer to transfer the design directly into the embroidery digitizing program without using intermediary software.

Scaling


Ability within one design program to enlarge or reduce a design. In expanded format, most scaling is limited to 10 percent to 20 percent because the stitch count remains constant despite final design size. In condensed or outline formats, on the other hand, scale changes may be more dramatic because stitch count and density may be varied.

Trimming


Operation in the finishing process that involves trimming the reverse and top sides of the embroidery, including jump stitches and backing.

Two-ply Stitch


A two-ply stitch is a running stitch that goes from point A to point B and then goes back from point B to point A and stops.

The 360 Embroidery


The 360 embroidery is a term. There is a way to sew the front, the right side and the left side of a cap all at once.

Tension


Tautness of thread when forming stitches. Top thread tension, as well as bobbin thread tension, needs to be set. Proper thread tension is achieved when about one third of the thread showing on the underside of the fabric on a column stitch is bobbin thread.

Underlay


Used under the regular stitching in a design. The stitches are placed to provide stability to the fabric and to create different effects. Underlay is normally a series of running stitches or a very light density fill often placed in the opposite direction that the stitching will go.

Underlay stitch


Stitches laid down before other design elements to help stabilize stretchy fabrics and to tack down high naps on fabrics so the design's details don't get lost.

3D Puff


3D puff embroidery is another way of sewing, which involves use of foam under the threads. Sewing is normally done on the edge of the form, leaving the middle part of the form having the effect of being elevated.

3D-Effect


3D-effect embroidery, by contrast, is direct embroidery with fabric and thread only – no foam. Thick underlay and lots of thread are usually used to achieve the three-dimensional effect.

 
 
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